Support Microentreprenuers !

We need your help to support new innovative investments and policies that support business formation, self-employment and the start up of lots of very small businesses. It’s not just small business that’s the backbone of the economy, micro-business is the backbone. It’s the 25.5 million micro-businesses or 88 percent of the country’s businesses that are the backbone.  However microenterprises are the least supported.

Create Jobs

Micro businesses are powerful economic engines.
Microentrepreneurs are more apt to use local workers and contractors when the need arises. The need for self-sufficiency and job has many sparked a remarkable growth in the number of women business owners—and these figures are poised to increase. From 1997 to 2013, the number of female-owned firms in the United States grew by 59 percent–one-and-a-half times the national average.

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Improve Neighborhoods

Microenterprise are engines for community wealth-building strategies.
Microentrepreneurs are more apt to use local workers and contractors when the need arises. The need for self-sufficiency and jobs has sparked a remarkable growth in the number of women business owners—and these figures are poised to increase. From 1997 to 2013, the number of female-owned firms in the United States grew by 59 percent–one-and-a-half times the national average.

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Alleviate Poverty

46% of single mothers in Monroe county are unemployed and without a college degree.
Women are starting new businesses at an alarming rate, 59% growth from 1997 to 2013…Rochester is considered the 5th poorest city in the nation today. 14.9% of Rochester’s families live on an income less than $10,000. A shocking 57.3% female-headed households with children live below the poverty line. Among Caucasians, 24% of individuals will experience poverty each year, while 40.2% African American individuals will experience poverty.

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Start-ups and very small businesses need four basic things to succeed — personal coaching, enterprise coaching and training, connections to community such as customers and banks, and enterprise advocacy.

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Enterprise Development & Capacity Building

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Personal development

Starting a business requires a complete change in every aspect of life. Operating a microenterprise can be a daunting lifestyle on the job and at home. Owners need coaching to help them adjusting to new activities, strategies, and expectations in their lives.

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Community Access

Access to the community for developing social and financial capital. Social capital is required to build customers and vendors.  Without financial capital or money, most owners will not survive.

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Enterprise development

Business assistance programs teach business owners to create a viable business model, write a well thought out business plan, identify target markets, create a marketing plan and find new customers. When business owners receive business assistance, they have an 80 percent success rate and create two jobs on average over three-to-five years. According to Association for Enterprise Opportunity, these businesses generate $2.4 trillion in receipts and account for 17 percent of GDP and employ more than 31 million people.

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Advocacy

Microenterprises need people and organizations to advocate for collaborations that help them build bargaining power, eliminate gender and race-based discrimination, and support social mobilization.